Newtek

NewTek was founded in 1986, by Tim Jenison scientist, artist, musician and unfulfilled filmmaker. Tim, and a group of other wannabe movie-makers set out to break free from the studio establishment and make their own films and television shows. They invented some pretty amazing tools that were easy to use (no rocket science required), affordable (don’t mortgage the house), and just plain fun.

Tens of thousands of people fell in love with NewTek’s pioneering Video Toaster®— the world’s first real “television studio-in-a-box.” For the first time, everything to make a broadcast television show was available in one system: live switching, digital video transitions, titling, keying, video paint, still store, and 3D animation. NewTek ignited the desktop video revolution, and television production was never the same.

One of the incredible capabilities inside the Video Toaster was LightWave 3D®—a 3D animation toolset that paved the way for visual effects-laden television, animated films, and top-selling video games to hit the market, including “Babylon 5,” Stephen Spielberg’s “seaQuest DSV,” and “Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius.”

In 1993, NewTek made LightWave 3D available as standalone software. 3D graphics and animation no longer took a PhD, a supercomputer, and $40,000 worth of software. Starving artists everywhere could turn their creative vision into reality—fast, and on a shoestring budget. In fact, many of those starving LightWave™ artists went on to win Emmy® Awards for their stunning visual effects work―more so than any other group of 3D artists.

Newtek

Newtek

Product groups

Slow motion Slowmotion Virtual studio